Mediation

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Barry Johnson-Fay is a skilled mediator, bringing to every case extensive legal experience in negotiation and litigation. His unique approach provides a way for parties to fully explore their differences, identify their true feelings and the unmet needs and unsatisfied interests which lie beneath all conflicts and misunderstandings, leading to resolution of conflict in which all parties feel heard and understood, and feel good about the resolution which they have created.

The facilitative mediation process utilized by Barry Johnson-Fay is a voluntary one, in which each party agrees to openly and respectfully come together to work to find options and eventual solutions which can meet the needs and interests of each party, leaving behind the blaming and judging language which often characterizes personal conflict. Mediation often takes only a few hours, but can also extend over a period of weeks or months, as parties work together to clarify facts, express feelings, identify needs and interests, brainstorm options for resolution and find the solution which best meets everyone’s needs.

Mediation can be used at any stage of conflict—from the first beginnings of misunderstanding between parties to the last stages of litigation before trial in court. Mediation is well known as a process for resolving court conflicts, both civil and criminal, as well as the difficult and emotional issues around family break-ups and divorce. It can also be helpful in resolving other kinds of family tensions and disputes, both immediate and long-standing, including the kinds of issues that arise with elder care, at home and in institutional settings. In the workplace, mediation can help resolve issues between and among employees, as well as disputes and complaints involving supervisors and managers. In educational settings, it can facilitate positive resolutions of parent, student, teacher and administrative concerns, which serve the interests of children and strengthen the relationships among all parties. There is no limit to the contexts in which mediation can provide a positive, healthy, and effective process for dealing with conflict.